How much is insurance for a G1 driver?

Congratulations on your teen earning that G1 license! There’s a lot to learn, but it’s an important first step toward becoming a full-fledged driver. We have all the tips you need on what that means for your insurance rates right here.

Let’s get started!

How much is insurance for a G1 driver on your policy?

Parents or guardians aren’t likely to pay more for adding a teen G1 driver on the auto insurance policy because it’s just a learner’s permit. The G1 holder can’t drive on his or her own, requiring the presence of an experienced driver at all times (more on that below). The reasoning is that the supervising driver’s experience will keep the G1 driver safe and in good standing.

However, any collisions or driving convictions caused by a G1 driver could affect the rates of the policy holder, making it important to set clear limits on the driver in training.

This also means that, while G1 drivers can certainly buy their own cars, they could have a difficult time convincing a company to insure it. That’s why it’s usually just a good idea to inform your insurance company about the new G1 holder.

Does a G1 driver need insurance in Ontario?

Not on their own, as G1 drivers would learn on their parents’ policy. In fact, getting a solo auto insurance policy for a G1 driver would be quite difficult to do.Most insurance companies would be unlikely to insure a driver who hasn’t passed what is essentially the learner’s probationary period.

Having said that, it’s always a good idea to let your insurance company know when you’ve added a G1 license holder to your policy. It’s also mandatory to let your insurer know when that person earns a G2 license, as they’ll be able to drive alone on the roads without your supervision. That’s where your policy could see changes.

Restrictions of a G1 license

G1 drivers are required to gain driving experience for 12 months before taking a test to earn a G2 license. However, completing a driving course approved by the Ministry of Transportation can shorten that 12-month period down to 8 months. The Ministry highly recommends taking such a course. We have to agree, as certain insurance companies may be willing to provide lower rates for those that completed courses. It’s a formal acknowledgement of deeper knowledge as well as a commitment to roadside safety.

Remember these restrictions for G1 drivers on the road:

  1. Your blood-alcohol level must be zero, and there are no exceptions.
  2. You must be accompanied by a qualified driver in the front passenger seat who fits these criteria:
    1. Holds a full G license
    2. Has 4 years of driving experience
    3. Have a blood-alcohol level under 0.5%
  3. Everyone in the car must have a working seat belt (this is also just a good rule to follow in general).
  4. No driving between 12:00 AM and 05:00 AM.
  5. No driving on the 400-series highways
  6. No driving on certain high-speed routes, including:
    1. Queen Elizabeth Way (Hamilton)
    2. Don Valley Parkway (Toronto)
    3. Gardiner Expressway (Toronto)
    4. E.C. Row Expressway (Windsor)
    5. Conestoga Parkway (Kitchener-Waterloo)

It’s worth noting that G1 drivers can drive on any road if the accompanying driver is an on-duty driving instructor that has provided approval. That’s likely to happen during a driving test, after all.

What about an accident caused by a G1 driver?

If a G1 licensed driver is involved in an accident, the teen will be covered by the vehicle owner’s policy as long as they have the vehicle owner’s permission to be driving the vehicle and are following all the restrictions of driving with a G1 license. If the G1 licensed driver is found to be at fault, the accident will go through the vehicle owner’s insurance policy until the G1 driver is fully licensed with his or her own policy.

At that point, the accident can be transferred to their own policy. If this happens to you and your teen, until the teen is fully licensed, you may see an increase in your premiums. Check out our insights to lower your insurance rates for a G2 driver as well!

Having a G1 license gives your teen the opportunity to take his or her time in learning to drive. Enroll your teen in a reputable driver education program to help them improve their driving skills. While your teen has a G1 license, you might want to shop around and find the most affordable policy that will cover your teen once he or she has a G2 license.


Get a 3-minute quote online to see what your rate looks like to see for yourself!

Congratulations on your teen earning that G1 license! There’s a lot to learn, but it’s an important first step toward becoming a full-fledged driver. We have all the tips you need on what that means for your insurance rates right here.

Let’s get started!

How much is insurance for a G1 driver on your policy?

Parents or guardians aren’t likely to pay more for adding a teen G1 driver on the auto insurance policy because it’s just a learner’s permit.

The G1 holder can’t drive on his or her own, requiring the presence of an experienced driver at all times (more on that below). The reasoning is that the supervising driver’s experience will keep the G1 driver safe and in good standing.

However, any collisions or driving convictions caused by a G1 driver could affect the rates of the policy holder, making it important to set clear limits on the driver in training.

This also means that, while G1 drivers can certainly buy their own cars, they could have a difficult time convincing a company to insure it. That’s why it’s usually just a good idea to inform your insurance company about the new G1 holder.

Does a G1 driver need insurance in Ontario?

Not on their own, as G1 drivers would learn on their parents’ policy. In fact, getting a solo auto insurance policy for a G1 driver would be quite difficult to do.Most insurance companies would be unlikely to insure a driver who hasn’t passed what is essentially the learner’s probationary period.

Having said that, it’s always a good idea to let your insurance company know when you’ve added a G1 license holder to your policy. It’s also mandatory to let your insurer know when that person earns a G2 license, as they’ll be able to drive alone on the roads without your supervision. That’s where your policy could see changes.

Restrictions of a G1 license

G1 drivers are required to gain driving experience for 12 months before taking a test to earn a G2 license. However, completing a driving course approved by the Ministry of Transportation can shorten that 12-month period down to 8 months.

The Ministry highly recommends taking such a course. We have to agree, as certain insurance companies may be willing to provide lower rates for those that completed courses. It’s a formal acknowledgement of deeper knowledge as well as a commitment to roadside safety.

Remember these restrictions for G1 drivers on the road:

  1. Your blood-alcohol level must be zero, and there are no exceptions.
  2. You must be accompanied by a qualified driver in the front passenger seat who fits these criteria:
    1. Holds a full G license
    2. Has 4 years of driving experience
    3. Have a blood-alcohol level under 0.5%
  3. Everyone in the car must have a working seat belt (this is also just a good rule to follow in general).
  4. No driving between 12:00 AM and 05:00 AM.
  5. No driving on the 400-series highways
  6. No driving on certain high-speed routes, including:
    1. Queen Elizabeth Way (Hamilton)
    2. Don Valley Parkway (Toronto)
    3. Gardiner Expressway (Toronto)
    4. E.C. Row Expressway (Windsor)
    5. Conestoga Parkway (Kitchener-Waterloo)

It’s worth noting that G1 drivers can drive on any road if the accompanying driver is an on-duty driving instructor that has provided approval. That’s likely to happen during a driving test, after all.

What about an accident caused by a G1 driver?

If a G1 licensed driver is involved in an accident, the teen will be covered by the vehicle owner’s policy as long as they have the vehicle owner’s permission to be driving the vehicle and are following all the restrictions of driving with a G1 license.

If the G1 licensed driver is found to be at fault, the accident will go through the vehicle owner’s insurance policy until the G1 driver is fully licensed with his or her own policy.

At that point, the accident can be transferred to their own policy. If this happens to you and your teen, until the teen is fully licensed, you may see an increase in your premiums. Check out our insights to lower your insurance rates for a G2 driver as well!

Having a G1 license gives your teen the opportunity to take his or her time in learning to drive. Enroll your teen in a reputable driver education program to help them improve their driving skills.

While your teen has a G1 license, you might want to shop around and find the most affordable policy that will cover your teen once he or she has a G2 license.


Get a 3-minute quote online to see what your rate looks like to see for yourself!

Seriously, what else can you do in 3 minutes?

Boil half an egg?

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